So chumpy, you can carve it

Thats not how you eat porridge!

0 notes

Buggered

Bit off a little bit more than I could chew in tonight’s kitchen adventures-

Made/Eaten:

Beetroot Tarte Tatin

Rhubarb Yeast Cake

In Progess:

Apple Cinnamon Breakfast scrolls 

Chestnut biscuits 

Feeling pretty pleased overall- if my bread mojo continues to be good, I should have some excellent scrolls for Easter. Hopefully now I can pull together the energy to clean the kitchen!

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Kitchen Adventures

The problem with cooking new things is that it can generate a strong urge for New Kitchen Toys. I have a new cookbook (River Cottage Veg Everyday for those who are interested)-the cookbook is pretty good so far, but it has made me want (in no particular order)- a mouli, a mandoline and a tarte tatin pan. The cupboards are full…. Must…..RESIST.

592 notes

atlasobscura:

Leftover Star Wars Sets - Tozeur, Tunisia

While much of George Lucas’ mythic Star Wars films were filmed in studio lots or in preexisting structures, a number of their exterior sets, especially for the desert planet Tatooine, were purpose built for the films and simply abandoned to the sands and the fans when filming was over. 

While the most famous left over Star Wars set may be the Hotel Sidi Driss, a Tunisian hotel which was used as the interior of the Lars moisture farm, Luke Skywalker’s teenage home, many more structures were built just for the production such as the Lars farm exterior and most of the city of Mos Espa.

In Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace the spaceport of Mos Espa is shown as a bustling frontier town where young Anakin Skywalker lives and works as a slave. Many of the bulbous structures were filled in using CGI, but much of the first stories of the buildings were built practically and still stand as a squat beige town square that looks as though it was shaved cleanly off at the top. The facades are not actually buildings, but fronts built for filming, yet visitors can still mill about the exteriors as though they were on that far flung desert planet. There are also some iconic “moisture vaperators” also left on the site.

But Tatooine is in trouble! Find out how on Atlas Obscura…

19,223 notes

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

Ancient pocket calculator

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

Ancient pocket calculator

(via erinkyan)